Metallica Raises Money for Charity in WorldWired Tour

Metallica Raises Money for Charity in WorldWired Tour

Oct 27

Metallica, the 37-year-old heavy metal band from Los Angeles, California, is in the middle of their WorldWired tour, a three-year tour supporting their Hardwired… to Self-Destruct album from 2016. The WorldWired tour also saw the creation of the band’s nonprofit foundation, All Within My Hands, named after a song from their 2003 album, St. Anger. “All Within My Hands Foundation is dedicated to creating sustainable communities by supporting workforce education, the fight against hunger, and other critical local services,” the foundation’s website reads. In this globe-spanning tour, the band has been donating some of the funds raised at each concert to local services, such as volunteer fire stations, children’s charities, and food banks. For instance, after their concert at Pennsylvania State College, they coordinated with Feeding America and with the Central Pennsylvania Food Bank’s organization to donate $10,000. That check will provide close to 60,000 meals to the organization, which supports food banks in 27 Pennsylvania counties. “This donation is really important going into the holiday season,” said Jennifer Sands, communications manager for the Central Pennsylvania Food Bank. “So we’re very excited about it.” The holiday season is often a particularly difficult time for low-income families, with winter weather causing extra expenses and leaner job opportunities. Metallica lists five major charities they’ve supported in 2018 on their website, but a browse through their photo gallery shows many more. Since the early ’80s, they have been a band with global impact. It’s heartening to see that impact spread from the art world to good works. They have a nearly infinite platform, coupled with a far-reaching voice. Watching them build a larger table can only have a net positive effect on the world. All Within My Hands also runs a regular fundraiser, the first Tuesday of every month, over eBay. Unique band memorabilia is auctioned off with proceeds going to help fund the foundation’s donations. The next one will take place on Tuesday, November...

Elon Musk Helps Fix Flint Water Crisis

Elon Musk Helps Fix Flint Water Crisis

Oct 21

Back in July, Tesla CEO Elon Musk tweeted that he would help fix the water quality issues in Flint, Michigan. “Please consider this a commitment that I will fund fixing the water in any house in Flint that has water contamination above FDA levels. No kidding,” he tweeted, in response to a follower saying it couldn’t be done. A few days later, the office of Flint Mayor Karen Weaver confirmed that he had, in fact, reached out. On October 4, the Flint Community Schools district confirmed that the Musk Foundation would be giving every school in the city new water stations with building-wide filtration to ensure that Flint’s 4,500 students will have access to clean water. “Thank you… for investing in the health/future well-being [of] FCS Students! Your generous donation will help us replace ALL water fountains w/ NEW WATER STATIONS & WATER FILTRATION at ALL SCHOOLS! Looking forward to our burgeoning partnership! More to come!” the school district tweeted. Musk responded, “You’re most welcome. Hope to do more to help in the future.” The Musk Foundation, which is based in California, is heavily focused on advocacy, STEM education, and pediatric research. Founded in 2002 by Elon Musk and his brother, the foundation has donated on average $800,000 per year in grants and disbursements to various causes. The plumbing renovations in Flint are estimated to cost nearly $500,000, which is why it was impossible for the bankrupt city to manage without aid. Earlier this year, nearby Detroit shut off all drinking water to the city’s 106 schools, serving 50,000 students. Flint may be the flagship for water quality control, but the problem is much, much larger. Hopefully, Musk’s example will lead to more community involvement in solving this...

21 Years of Bottle Deposits Adds Up to $15,000 Donation

21 Years of Bottle Deposits Adds Up to $15,000 Donation

Oct 12

Day by day, dollar by dollar, a single woman has donated an estimated $15,000 to the British Columbia Cancer Foundation over the last 21 years. Gia Tran, who is 62, spends every day patrolling the sidewalks of her neighborhood in downtown Vancouver, B.C., collecting empty bottles. She gathers all she can carry, bulging plastic bags hooked on her arm, and then walks to the bottle return depot to trade them in for cash. Just a few cents each, but it adds up. Each weekday (when the depot is open) she earns $10, maybe as much as $20. Then she walks it directly to the home office of the British Columbia Cancer Foundation, to donate her earnings with a bright air. “It’s always the same,” said Dianne Parker, a receptionist at the foundation’s office. “She comes in with a big smile and she always says, ‘I love everybody here, and I want to help people.’” That fits with what Tran says about her own persistence, going out to hunt recyclables all year-round, over her children’s objections in the winter. “I say: ‘No, I go. I want to help people,’” she describes herself as arguing when her children would rather she stay home in the cold. Tran could take the bus, but the bus drivers tend not to let her carry so much, so if she has a large haul, she walks. She says the trip takes as much as an hour and a half, more if she’s found a lot of glass bottles since they’re heavier than plastic or cans. Sarah Roth, the chief executive of the British Columbia Cancer Foundation, loves seeing Tran each day. “She is like the joy of our day when she comes, absolutely,” Roth told CBC. “No matter what kind of day you’re having, when Gia comes in, you forget about it and you just focus on her warmth and her laughter and her true...

Apple to Give $1 Million in Aid to Sulawesi

Apple to Give $1 Million in Aid to Sulawesi

Oct 04

On Friday, September 28, a 7.5 magnitude earthquake struck the Indonesian island of Sulawesi. The quake triggered a tsunami that leveled multiple cities. Together, the two natural disasters caused a death toll currently known to exceed 1,400. It also destroyed thousands of homes. Humanitarian aid has been slow to reach the hardest hit areas, due to damaged infrastructure and a lack of heavy machinery. The United Nations currently estimates that 200,000 people are stranded in the worst zones and need urgent help, with about 66,000 destroyed homes. Adding to the nightmare, the volcano Mount Soputan—which stands on the northeastern-most end of the island—began to erupt early in the morning on Wednesday, October 3. It sent a three-mile tower of ash into the sky, making it very difficult to fly into Sulawesi’s airfield. On Tuesday, October 2, Apple CEO Tim Cook announced that the tech giant would be donating $1 million to help the stricken island. “Our hearts go out to the people of Sulawesi and all of Indonesia after this weekend’s devastating earthquake and tsunami. Apple is donating $1 million to aid relief efforts as this beautiful country starts to rebuild,” he tweeted. While $1 million is approximately what Apple makes every 20 minutes, the company does have a solid track record of donating to emergency relief efforts around the world. Just a few days before this announcement, they pledged $1 million to the American Red Cross for the victims of Hurricane Florence. A month ago, they donated nearly the same amount to help those caught in the Kerala floods in India. Sometime last year, they donated $5 million after Hurricane Harvey. The company has also put millions towards helping those affected by California’s wild fires. There is no law requiring that companies donate any money at all, so the fact that Apple chose to do so on its own accord shows that they truly...

Salesforce Pumps Millions into Underserved Schools

Salesforce Pumps Millions into Underserved Schools

Sep 28

Salesforce.org, the charitable arm of a cloud-computing company based in San Francisco, has been in a philanthropic relationship with two Bay Area school districts for five years now. This year, the combined $15.5 million donations put their contributions over $50 million. San Francisco Unified School District will be receiving $8 million, and the slightly smaller Oakland Unified School District will get $7.5 million. The money is earmarked for STEM support, teacher training, and mindfulness projects. Mindfulness, while something of a workplace buzzword, is a big focus for Salesforce’s charity organization. They want to promote education that takes into account a student’s whole life, a “whole child,” approach. “Because we know that what happens outside of the classroom impacts what happens inside the classroom,” explained Ebony Frelix, the executive vice president and chief philanthropy officer of Salesforce.org. Putting their money where their mouth is, the organization also donated $2 million towards fighting youth homelessness, announced in the same breath on September 25, by Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff. London Breed, current Mayor of San Francisco, lauded the philanthropic organization. “We are going to change what is normal in San Francisco because we are going to invest in our kids on the front end,” he said. “We are going to make sure that the doors of opportunity in the technology field are open to them.” Oakland Unified School District, which will receive $7.5 million, has formed a “Principal’s Innovation Fund,” where the money can be used at the individual school level. So far, they have used past donations to create a makerspace, support students who are refugees, and incorporate mental health services, all of which increase the ways in which students can access their education. More of the funds have also gone into training teachers to more effectively teach and use technology, and to make computer science education more...