Dubai Officials Angry Over Kim Kardashian Charity Visit

Dubai Officials Angry Over Kim Kardashian Charity Visit

Jan 25
Dubai Officials Angry Over Kim Kardashian Charity Visit

Say what you will about Kim Kardashian, but the fact is she is extremely generous. In an interview with E! Entertainment, Kardashian revealed that she gives 10 percent of her income to charity. In other words, she donates millions of dollars to noble causes.

While most people would find this rather honorable, Dubai officials certainly didn’t. During a recent trip to the city, Kardashian paid a visit to the Rashid Center for the Disabled. The organization provides education and therapy services to children with special needs.

So what’s the problem? According to Dhahi Khalfan, a senior Dubai police official, the problem is that her visit was “unauthorized.”

“We do not need the presence of Kim Kardashian in charity centers … charities (should) invite good people, and thank God we have plenty of good people,” Khalfan tweeted.

But just because police officials didn’t welcome Kardashian’s visit, that doesn’t mean the children didn’t. In fact, the children’s reaction was quite the contrary. They extended a warm welcome to Kardashian, greeting her with smiles and dance performances.

Kardashian reported being overjoyed by the children’s excitement. In a recent Twitter post, she said that the children were her favorite part of the trip.

“My favorite part of the trip was visiting Rashid Paediatric Therapy Center. These beautiful children showed me a performance of a lifetime!” Kardashian wrote.

Even the Rashid Paediatric Therapy Center deemed it an “amazing day” on its Facebook page. So then why was it such a big deal?

Because the Rashid Center didn’t get “approval” for hosting the American celebrity. As a result, the Ministry of Community Development fined the center for being in violation of its activity approval policy.

It’s a shame that something so well intended went awry. It serves as a gentle reminder that foreign charities have different rules than U.S.-based ones.

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